Recent Projects

 
 
 


PROJECT 1: Eastern Alberta Transmission Line

Henry Drilling has been called to assist Sharp’s Construction with drilled shafts for the Eastern Alberta Transmission Line. Sharp’s is a drilled shaft company that already has up to eight drill rigs on the project, but due to the extreme time constraints, massive amount of drilled shafts and late start due to access issues, additional support was needed. Henry Drilling supplied a SR-50 drill rig and a SR-65 drill to the project, along with a 200-6 vibratory hammer and 100-ton Kobelco crawler crane. Henry Drilling looks forward to getting into full swing on the project.

Our SR-50 preparing to drill a shaft.

Our SR-50 preparing to drill a shaft.

Crisp Alberta morning!

Crisp Alberta morning!


The SR-50 pulling a night shift.

The SR-50 pulling a night shift.




PROJECT 2: Evergreen Rapid Transit Station

Henry Drilling was chosen to complete all of the drilled shaft packages for the new rapid transit line stations.

Lougheed special structures: Henry Drilling has completed the first station at Lougheed and North Road, Coquitlam. This station and special structure required two 6’ diameter drilled shafts to 66’ depth, which were completed with our BG36V with 2-metre oscillator and 1800mm segmental casing. Challenges included a small work site and working within feet of the live elevated guide way carrying the current SkyTrain. After the 6’ shafts were installed the machinery was moved to do a special structure carrying the guide way over an active restaurant. Nine foot diameter shafts up to 21m deep and advanced under polymer slurry were installed as close as 8’ from an active and still open restaurant.

The six shafts were installed without any incidents and although there were challenging soil conditions and challenging site conditions -- which included granite boulders up to 8’ in diameter -- the work was finished in a timely manner.

Lafarge Douglas station: This station has 19 pcs 6’ diameter drilled piles with permanent 6’ x 1” wall pipe. Henry Drilling has elected to install these piles using a Bauer BG36V drill and a Bauer BG28 drill, both with 2-metre oscillators. Pile conditions are tough with artesian water pressures and different layers of cobbles and boulders. This station is currently under way and going well.

Cleaning out a shaft at the Evergreen Rapid Transit Station.

Cleaning out a shaft at the Evergreen Rapid Transit Station.

The BG36 and 2-metre oscillator working on the Evergreen SkyTrain project.

The BG36 and 2-metre oscillator working on the Evergreen SkyTrain project.


The BG36 in action.

The BG36 in action.

The Kobelco crane lifting one of our 2-metre oscillators into place.

The Kobelco crane lifting one of our 2-metre oscillators into place.

The BG36 on site.

The BG36 on site.


Our cranes tripping a cage.

Our cranes tripping a cage.

The Kobelco crane lifting one of our 2-metre oscillators into place.

The Kobelco crane lifting one of our 2-metre oscillators into place.

The BG36 on site.

The BG36 on site.


Our cranes tripping a cage.

Our cranes tripping a cage.

Mantis crane in action.

Mantis crane in action.

The boys hard at work splicing a pile and torching the next piece of 1 inch pipe.

The boys hard at work splicing a pile and torching the next piece of 1 inch pipe.


Preparing to set another cage.

Preparing to set another cage.



PROJECT 3: South Shore Corridor, Port of Vancouver, B.C., Winter and spring, 2013

To help with the foundation for an elevated road way at the Port of Vancouver, Henry Drilling installed 15 drilled shafts 9’ in diameter, with depths varying from 55’ to 75’. Rather than using permanent pipe on each shaft, we installed secant pile compression rings as casing through overburdens. We employed four drills for the project: the Soilmec SR-80, SR-50, SR-30, and the Bauer BG18. We also used our Kobelco 110-ton crawler crane and Mantis crane to hoist the massive rebar cages, some of which weighed up to 102,000 pounds. To help with schedule, we often ran 24-hour shifts. Challenges on this site included extremely tight working conditions, large granite boulders and bedrock with compressive strengths up to 100mpa.

Preparing to hoist a rebar cage.

Preparing to hoist a rebar cage.

Setting a rebar cage.

Setting a rebar cage.


110 ton Kobelco in action.

110 ton Kobelco in action.

We are running a 24-hour shift to install the secant pile compression rings.

We are running a 24-hour shift to install the secant pile compression rings.

The BG18 in action at the Port of Vancouver.

The BG18 in action at the Port of Vancouver.


Drilling through glacial till.

Drilling through glacial till.

We are running a 24-hour shift to install the secant pile compression rings.

We are running a 24-hour shift to install the secant pile compression rings.

An overhead view of the BG-18, SR-80 and 110-ton crane in action at South Shore.

An overhead view of the BG-18, SR-80 and 110-ton crane in action at South Shore.


An overhead view of the overhead roadway being constructed on Henry Drilling’s drilled shafts.

An overhead view of the overhead roadway being constructed on Henry Drilling’s drilled shafts.




PROJECT 4: Gas Extraction Wells at Kamloops Landfill, December, 2013

Henry Drilling was also hired to do the drilling at the Kamloops Landfill, where more than 30 gas extraction wells were required for installation. These wells are 3’ in diameter and approximately 80’ deep.

Gas Extraction Wells at Kamloops Landfill.

Using a core-barrel grab to drill the well.

Gas Extraction Wells at Kamloops Landfill.

The SR-30 drilling a well.






PROJECT 5: Shoring Wall for Evergreen Rapid Transit Project, Port Moody, B.C., Fall, 2013

For this project we installed 150 secant piles 3’ in diameter, with depths up to 70’. The secant piles created a shoring structure to allow a tunnel-boring machine to drill through Burnaby Mountain as part of the Evergreen Rapid Transit Project. Timeline was of the utmost importance, so we employed three drill rigs in a tight area and completed the project in a month. Drilling conditions on this project were difficult, as an old river bed lay underneath the soil. Some of the boulders encountered were as big as 8’ wide, and about 5’ deep. Despite these adverse conditions, we completed the project on time.

This is a pic of our finished secant pile wall, with crews getting the tunnel-boring machine prepared.

This is a pic of our finished secant pile wall, with crews getting the tunnel-boring machine prepared.







PROJECT 6: Gas Extraction Wells at Vancouver Landfill, Summer, 2013

For gas extraction purposes, Henry Drilling was hired to create 17 wells at the Vancouver Landfill. These wells were 3’ in diameter, and went upwards of 130’ deep. We also assembled and installed a 10” pipe inside each well for gas extraction purposes. This project went well and we finished on schedule.



PROJECT 7: Bailey Landfill, Chilliwack, B.C., Summer, 2013

Another landfill job we completed in 2013 was the Bailey Landfill in Chilliwack, B.C., which saw us drill approximately 20 wells 50’ deep and 2’ in diameter. We sent two drill rigs to complete this project.


PROJECT 8: North West Transmission Line

When Valard Construction was awarded the NTL line from Bob Quinn Lake to Terrace, B.C., planning began on large diameter drilled shafts through the avalanche zones in the Bob Quinn Lake area, which is located approximately 300km north of Terrace up Highway 37. This stretch of land comprises gravels, silts, hard rock of over 100mpa, swamps, environmentally sensitive areas and boulders. Sharp's Construction was awarded the drilled shaft package and Henry Drilling was awarded as a sub-contractor to Sharp's Construction. This was the second contract awarded to Henry Drilling by Sharp's Construction, the first being a caisson job in Vancouver that consisted of 6’, 7’ and 8’ diameter caissons up to 90’ deep.

Lattice-boom crawler cranes, Hydraulic crawler cranes, drills, excavators, vibratory hammers, loaders, etc. were all deployed to complete this difficult project. There were many key challenges to this project, including, logistics, hard rock, schedule, concrete and preserving the environment.

Logistics: The logistics on this job were very difficult to deal with, including 67 drilled shafts spread out over 40km and a four-hour drive to the nearest parts store. Storage containers with extra parts, components, tools, etc. were sent to make sure the fleet of equipment was kept running. Due to this being a power line the equipment needed to be torn down to reduce transport weights and moved from location to location. An 85 ton 3+3+3 low bed was purchased and sent up to help move the equipment from site to site and this reduced the amount of tear down needed from hole to hole and shaved weeks off of schedule.

Hard Rock: Rock augers, core barrels, core barrel grabs, buckets in 3’, 6’, 7’, 8’, 9’ and 10’ diameters were shipped to the drilled shaft site to help combat the difficult drilling conditions. A Soilmec SR-80, SR-65 and SR-50 were deployed to the drill locations and the drilled shafts ensued through the difficult rock conditions. Coring, augering, hole stepping and other methods were necessary to complete these drilled shafts that were up to 10’ in diameter.

Schedule: Due to extreme snowfall (4-10’) in this area and a late start due to access issues, the schedule was extremely tight. All crews worked 12-hour-plus shifts daily, and on difficult rock holes a 24-hour-a-day operation was performed. Henry Drilling and Sharp's Construction worked together to meet the scheduling goals, and we were finished all of the 67 drilled shafts plus additionally added shafts before winter closed in.

Concrete: Valard Construction set up their own batch plant for the concrete. Although Henry Drilling had reservations about this Valard did a fantastic job of supplying quality concrete on time and on spec for the project. With a fleet of five trucks the concrete was supplied and installed to meet the specifications of the contract.

Environment: This project was under the microscope when it came to environmental controls. There was a major section of drilled shafts in an active fish-bearing area and all environmental controls needed to be in place. Valard, Sharp's and Henry Drilling all participated in finding solutions to installing the shafts with no impact to the environment. Spoil bins, water containment, water treatment, silt fences, rock barricades, etc. all played a part in making this section of the job a success.

Drilling an 8' shaft in Terrace.

Drilling an 8' shaft in Terrace.

Transporting the SR-80 with the 85-ton lowbed.

Transporting the SR-80 with the 85-ton lowbed.


Setting a pipe with the 110-ton Kobelco crane along the highway.

Setting a pipe with the 110-ton Kobelco crane along the highway.

Close-up photo of the SR-80.

Close-up photo of the SR-80.

Setting another pipe with the Kobelco.

Setting another pipe with the Kobelco.


Dropping in a rebar cage.

Dropping in a rebar cage.




PROJECT 9: Donald Bridge

Henry Drilling was chosen as the foundations contractor for the Donald bridge project in Golden, B.C. This was a diverse piling package with rock sockets into rock up to R3 classification, permanent pipe piles with rock sockets and permanent pipe piles driven and PDA tested to depths of nearly 300′.

Rock socketed piles

We mobilized our Soilmec SR-80 to the west side of the bridge, where we installed rock sockets of 8m into medium/hard rock at Pier 1. For Pier 2 permanent pipe casings were advanced through the overburden from 20′ to 50′ in depth and 8m rock sockets were installed. Henry Drilling also installed the rebar and concrete using the tremie method. Work was completed on schedule and on budget.

Driven Pipe piles

Pier 3 consisted of 36″ pipe piles driven to rock 290′ deep. These piles were started with a vibratory hammer and then driven using a D62 and D160 diesel hammer. Pier 4 used 4′ diameter pipe piles driven to a depth of 240′ using the same hammers. A 230-ton crawler crane and a 100-ton crawler crane were on site to drive and stack piles and crews worked 24 hours a day to maintain schedule. Pier 4 piles were extremely challenging due to the massive rebounding of the piles in clay layers, causing severe pile damage at the top of the piles and slow drive times. Henry Drilling completed all piles on budget and only one week behind schedule despite the extreme driving conditions.

The Soilmec SR-80 works on Pier 2 of the Donald Bridge.

The Soilmec SR-80 works on Pier 2 of the Donald Bridge.

To ship the SR-80 from our yard to Golden, we had to take off the kelly bar, rotary, counterweight, tracks and entire mast.

For the shipping of the SR-80 from our yard to Golden, we had to take off the kelly bar, rotary, counterweight, tracks and entire mast.


To ship the SR-80 from our yard to Golden, we had to take off the kelly bar, rotary, counterweight, tracks and entire mast.

The SR-80 naked.

To ship the SR-80 from our yard to Golden, we had to take off the kelly bar, rotary, counterweight, tracks and entire mast.

To ship the SR-80 from our yard to Golden, we had to take off the kelly bar, rotary, counterweight, tracks and entire mast.






PROJECT 10: Rogers Arena

In order to build a new high-profile hotel that cantilevers over Rogers Arena, a substantial drilled shaft package was needed.

This project presented many challenges, including a tiny work site barely large enough to store the equipment (let alone build drilled shafts), a very tight timeline for drilled shaft completion, complicated soils conditions and top of drilled shafts up to 4m below ground level.

Henry Drilling deployed a brand new Soilmec SR-50, Bauer BG18, Hitachi ZX330 and a Leffer 1.5m oscillator along with Leffer casing to complete the work. Soils conditions consisted of 1-3m of fill underlain by glacial till with granite boulders, underlain by conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone bedrock with floaters (boulders in bedrock).

The water table was 7m below ground and drilled shafts were up to 24m below work surface. Some of the issues in construction were that the ground was very stiff through the top 7m, then a soft 1m thick water-bearing zone was encountered, then very stiff tills from 10-12m depth into a soft water-bearing sand zone overlying bedrock.

Both till and bedrock had lots of granite boulders to core through. This presented challenges to case, core and seal off the soft zones to ensure a quality drilled shaft.

Further complicating matters, some of the shafts close to Rogers Arena had 6m of washed sand backfill from previous construction at the top of the hole. The oscillator and casing were quickly deployed when the sand was discovered (it was not in any reports) and the casing was advanced through the boulders, hard till and bedrock to shaft tip. This process was very time consuming and weekend shifts were worked to keep the schedule on target.

Rogers Arena Tower Expansion.

Drilling a shaft with the Bauer BG18.

Rogers Arena Tower Expansion.

Setting a 20-metre rebar cage.


Rogers Arena Tower Expansion.

Drilling a shaft with the SR-50.

Rogers Arena Tower Expansion.

Setting a rebar cage.






PROJECT 11: Worsley Pile Wall

In order to stop a land slide in Worsley, Alberta Transportation opted to build a large pile shear wall. Henry Drilling was selected as the drilling contractor and mobilized to site. After some access issues that slowed the start of the project, the 49pcs of 5’ diameter piles were installed using a 100-ton crawler crane, a Soilmec drill and support equipment. These piles were 27m deep and required some work to install, including full length temporary casings, and pumps. After a slow start to the project and a lost casing, the pace was picked up and the wall was completed on schedule. Difficulties on this job included sand seams, water, access, full length rebar cages and full length temporary casings.

Worsley pile wall, Worsley, Alberta.

Drilling a 5' diameter pile.

Worsley pile wall, Worsley, Alberta.

Setting the cage with the 100-ton crawler crane and SR-30 drill rig.


Worsley pile wall, Worsley, Alberta.

Looking down the pile wall.



PROJECT 12: Coquitlam Water Shed

After shotcrete shoring failed for the earth retention at the Coquitlam Water Shed, the design changed to a secant pile wall to stabilize around the excavation. The soils consisted of silts with sand and water seams. Henry Drilling was chosen on the basis of price, experience and availability to construct the secant walls. These secant pile walls consisted of 750mm piles at 600mm centres and up to 16m deep. A Soilmec SR-80 in CFA and a Soilmec SR-30 PDW with 750mm segmental casing were chosen to install the piles. The project went well and Henry Drilling was awarded a second smaller wall several months later.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.


Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed

Henry Drilling – Coquitlam Water Shed.





PROJECT 13: Surrey City Hall Foundation

In order to construct the new Surrey city hall building, designers were left with a difficult decision on how to shore the main dig area. Soils were 1 to 2m of fill overlying 1 to 5m of peat and very soft sensitive clays overlying very stiff glacial tills with a large gravel, cobble and granite boulder component.

After looking at all options, a secant pile wall with tie backs was chosen for the project. This option met the schedule, budget and design guidelines. The shoring walls included a total of 340pcs 750mm diameter on 600mm centers down to a depth of up to 13.5m. Henry Drilling used several Soilmec drills to complete this difficult project.

Using our SR-80 to drill 50' holes through cobbles and boulders at the new Surrey City Hall.

Using our SR-80 to drill 50' holes through cobbles and boulders at the new Surrey City Hall.

Building the secant pile wall with our SR-80 and SR-30.

Building the secant pile wall with our SR-80 and SR-30.


Finished product after we completed our end of the project.

Finished product after we completed our part of the project.



PROJECT 14: Tumbler Ridge, B.C.

This job required large diameter drilled shafts to 8.5’ diameter on either side of the Murray River for a power line with a span over 1 km long. The drilled shafts on one side of the river went quickly, but the other three shafts encountered unusually hard Sandstone with an unconfined compressive strength of over 100mpa and had a high content of quartz and feldspar.

This material was very difficult to drill and needed to be taken out in smaller pcs, then cored to the proper diameter. This turned out to be a tough task resulting in a broken Kelly bar, high counts of drilling teeth and 12-hour-plus days consecutively until the work was complete. The final result was high-quality drilled shafts set deep into hard rock, which provided the appropriate foundations for these towers.

Don Henry stands beside a rock core that was pulled from one of the shafts.

Don Henry stands beside a rock core that was pulled from one of the shafts.

Coring through hard rock.

Coring through hard rock.





PROJECT 15: Hillside Shoring Wall, White Rock, B.C.

In order to excavate for a new building in White Rock, shoring was needed on a very steep hill and permission to install tie back anchors was denied from surrounding owners. Henry Drilling installed 14x117 h-piles 65’ deep through overburden and into water-bearing gravels.

This project turned out to be extremely difficult and was completed using telescoping casing and tremie pours. A bench 30’ above ground level was built to provide access, although access to the bench was nearly vertical.

This job encompassed many of the obstacles that make Vancouver and its surrounding areas so difficult to drill in.

To complete this project we used temporary casing on all 10 piles.

To complete this project we used temporary casing on all 10 piles.

The view from this Victoria Avenue site in White Rock was nice, but the job was very difficult.

The view from this Victoria Avenue site in White Rock was nice, but the job was very difficult.





PROJECT 16: Hydro Towers, Richmond, B.C.

Scope of work: Install 4 casings 7′ in diameter and 80′ deep, then clean the inside of the casings out to approximately 24′.

How we did it: On each of the four casings we used a vibratory hammer to install the first 40′ section of the 7′ diameter pipe, then spliced it and drove the next 40′ length of pipe.

Using a King Kong vibratory hammer to install the 7' pipe.

Using a King Kong vibratory hammer to install the 7' pipe.

Using a King Kong vibratory hammer to install the 7' pipe.

Even the King Kong had trouble driving this pipe.





PROJECT 17: Kistilano Shoring Wall, Vancouver, B.C.

Install 43 pcs of 12” x 74lb H-pile soldier piles to provide a cantilever wall in Kitsilano. The piles needed to be installed through the soft clay overburden, which was 5-7m deep and locked into 5-7m of sandstone. The water table was only 5’ below ground and the site was very small with access to site even tighter. These holes were drilled to nearly 40’, within inches of a 100-year-old house. The job was completed on schedule and on budget and was a success.

The finished product after we completed our part of the project.

The finished product after we completed our part of the project.

Access to this site was particularly difficult as our machine’s mast was literally three inches away from an existing building.

Access to this site was particularly difficult as our machine’s mast was literally three inches away from an existing building.





PROJECT 18: Building Foundation, Peace River, Alberta

After two other contractors failed to complete this project in Peace River, Alberta, Henry Drilling deployed a 100-ton crawler crane, vibratory hammer, full-length casing and an SR-30 drill rig to do the job. Boulders, water and running sand were all encountered on this project.

Using a vibratory hammer to install pipe.

Using a vibratory hammer to install pipe.

Our 100-ton crawler crane and SR-30 drill rig in action.

Our 100-ton crawler crane and SR-30 drill rig in action.





PROJECT 19: Capilano Bridge, North Vancouver, B.C.

Scope of work: The job was split into three piers. Piers one and three on the east and west sides of the river had 5 piles each, 36" in diameter and approximately 60' deep. Pier two in the centre had 5 piles, 60" in diameter and approximately 65' deep.

Reason for project: Replace the old Capilano Bridge on Marine Drive.

Challenges:

  • Cobbles and boulders up to 5' in diameter
  • Department of Fisheries and Oceans timeline to complete the work
  • Small working platforms
  • Working between two active bridges

How we did it: We used our Leffer 1.5-metre oscillator to advance the piles, and our SR80 drilling rig to clean them out.



PROJECT 20: Port Mann Highway 1 Project

Scope of work: As part of the Port Mann Highway 1 project, the Highway 1 overpasses at Sprott, Kensington and Grandview were replaced with new overpasses. There were 12 piles at Kensington 4' in diameter and approximately 48' deep; seven piles at Grandview ranging from 4-7' in diameter and 44-57' deep; and 10 piles at Sprott 4' in diameter ranging from 50-75' deep.

Challenges:

  • Working within 6' of Highway 1
  • Boulders up to 7' in diameter
  • CSL tested shafts
  • Slurry drilled shafts
  • Night work
  • Extremely dense rebar cages
  • Co-ordination of concrete trucks, pump trucks and highway lane closures

How we did it: 4' diameter segmental steel casing was advanced to depth, and cranes set the rebar cages. Concrete was tremie poured due to all the water in the holes. As the concrete was poured, the segmental casing was removed.



PROJECT 21: Soil Remediation Project, Vancouver, B.C.

Scope of work: 35 holes temporarily cased 40' deep, with 5' diameter

Reason for project: Remove localized, contaminated material, and replace with pea gravel for pumping out the rest of the contaminants.

Challenges:

  • Quick start-up time (two weeks from time of award, to starting)

How we did it: Used the Leffer 1.5-metre oscillator to advance the temporary casing, then cleaned out the piles with the SR30 drilling rig and removed the temporary casing.



PROJECT 22: Hydro Power Line Re-alignment

Scope of work: This project involved several different elements. Piles completed were 3', 4', 6', 7' and 8' in diameter, with depths to 90'.

Challenges:

  • On-call almost 24 hours a day for the duration of the project
  • Tight deadline
  • Night work
  • Tremie pouring concrete

How we did it: We used the SR30 to clean out the piles, and the SR80 to install 2 pcs 4' diameter pipe 60' long. The Spiradrill cleaned out the majority of the smaller piles.



PROJECT 23: Lions Gate Hospital

Scope of work: Drill 12 holes 30' to 33' deep and 30" in diameter, place rebar cages inside each hole and fill with concrete.

Reason for project: To solidify a foundation for the hospital's new emergency ward.

Challenges:

  • Extremely small job site on a main drag in North Vancouver, with very little room for cages, multiple casings, augers, core barrels and cleanout buckets
  • No vibrations and low noise for hospital patrons and nearby residents/businesses
  • Difficult ground conditions, including ground water and boulders up to 4' in diameter
  • Needed 10m long casings to case the holes

How we did it: We employed our sound-proofed Soilmec SR-30 drilling rig armed with spiral cut rock augers and coring barrels for the job. Not only did it work quietly, the rig was able to manouevre throughout the site relatively easily, and we were able to complete the contract in three weeks, including mobe/demobe and four concrete pours.



PROJECT 24: B.C. Hydro Substation

Scope of work: Clean out 100 pcs 16″ diameter piles, 30-40′ deep.

Challenges:

  • Lots of rocks the same size as the inside of the piles

How we did it: Using different core barrels and augers on the SR30, we were able to drill through all of the obstructions.



PROJECT 25: New Police Headquarters

Scope of work: Pre-drill sockets, and clean out 16" piles. Approximately 300 holes.

Challenges:

  • Small work site
  • Cobbles inside the piles

How we did it: We completed the job with the SR30 drill rig.



PROJECT 26: Willingdon and Still Creek Pre-Drilling

Scope of work: Pre-drilling of 503 piles, ranging from 25' to 40' depth and 16" in diameter.

Reason for project: Providing a foundation for high-rise office buildings. After attempts failed to drive closed-ended 16" pipe piles to 3-5 metres penetration into very dense sands with layers of sandstone, we predrilled to allow the pipe piles to reach penetration required.

How we did it: We used our Spiradrill and Soilmec SR-30 drills with custom-built augers and a custom-built kelly bar on our Soilmec to drill pilot holes to depth without removing any spoils. This was possible because of an extremely soft layer of clay and peat overlying the hard sands and sandstones. We used augers with special pitches and a smaller diameter kelly bar on our Soilmec to push through the soft layers and drill the sockets without removing spoils, which saved the prime contractor time and money.